Pictures of an exhibition (1)

Here are some pictures I took of the workstation columns for the comics museum:




The columns, still in their wrapping.


A partially-unwrapped half-column, with artwork by Adrian Ramos.



Another one with art by Jesse Hamm.
The printed area on each column is 120 centimeters tall!
The black and white art will look a lot tighter than the color art because I could vectorise it and enlarge the vectorized version. There’s a bit of a trade-off though; up close, it no longer looks like the artist’s original linework. On the other hand, the color art, which was simply scaled in Photoshop, looks pixelated up close. From normal viewing distances, both look fine – quite impressive, in fact.

Home system upgrade!

I’m posting this from my newly-upgraded PC! Pentium 4, two Gb memory and lots of complicated specifications in the motherboard so it must be good. I haven’t put the new system through its paces yet, but will undoubtedly find some way or other to slow it down.
Because I run linux (SuSE 9.0), configuration is not entirely without problems. I’ve got the ethernet card (onboard) working after a few tries, but the sound (also onboard) is still giving me trouble. I had managed to get it to work by using the config tools as root, clearing out all the previous installations and failed attempts, re-doing the auto-probe and then double-checking in XMMS, first as root, then as my regular username. That worked like a charm, but after a re-start (as part of my latest attempt to get the ethernet card to work) the sound card and XMMS are once again not talking to one another. Can any of you linuxy types among the readership help me out with this?

I should learn to relax a little

Mars Gremmen posts a sketched comic on his weblog that Hello You have turned down. That sucks for him, and the story in question is every bit as great as the ones that have made it into the magazine so far.

However, I take great comfort in knowing that he is still submitting scripts for issue 8 (the April issue) of the magazine, whereas I’m all done with my work for issue 9. The moral of this is that I have even more slack in my deadlines than I thought I had.

Still, if I was as good as him, I’d probably have the confidence to just be late too.

Museum progress

Today I’ve been to the Comics Museum to pick up a computer to set up the digital exhibit on. Work on the Museum is now definitely progressing.

I caught a glimpse of the pillars in which the computers will be mounted! The artwork is looking really good; it should, for the work involved in the production of the files drove me nuts. I’ve taken some pictures which I’ll upload and post as soon as I’ve located the cable that came with my camera.

You’re pretty good looking for a girl

Whitestripes.net, the semi-official fan site for the White Stripes, has a bunch of Peel Sessions by the popular beat combo. Plus a Saturday Night Live skit which is not very well-written but the way Drew Barrymore as Meg whispers “meesh meesh meesh” at the guy who plays Jack cracks me up.

I’m a reluctant White Stripes fan… cmkaapjes had to practically cram their music down my throat, but once I got to know it better I learned to love the writing, and the duo’s manic energy even at slow tempos.

Trip to Amsterdam

I took today off from my busy drawing schedule to go to Amsterdam for a meeting. I went to Lambiek’s new warehouse to talk to the warm bodies of Stripster’s editor Henk and the site’s technician Aart, as well as Margreet and Bas, who run Comiclopedia. Both these sites will be extensively featured in a project I’m working on for the Comics Museum I mentioned earlier. My project is a digital exhibit about webcomics, and Stripster will be included as an example of the Dutch approach to putting comics online, which is mainly to build group sites. Comiclopedia will supply a lot of the biographical information about the featured artists, and will hopefully get a lot of new biographical info in return for its participation.
All that stuff has to be integrated and scripted, so despite it being a six-hour round trip by train (plus lots of walking) for a short meeting it was useful for me to show them what my plans were and ask them what they needed to make it work. Plus it was nice to see Amsterdam again… I keep telling myself I don’t like Amsterdam much, but that is mainly a result of the mood I’m in when I arrive. This afternoon, it was quite a good place to be in.

After the meeting was concluded and some scurrilous gossip exchanged, I had some time to go shopping! First I browsed Lambiek’s own warehouse in the Utrechtsedwarsstraat, then I went to the actual shop that is located near its original location in de Kerkstraat (which it had to leave and which Lambiek’s owner is now selling). I was going to go to the Concerto music store in the Utrechtsestraat, quite near the warehouse, but it turned out the walk to the shop was a bit longer than I thought so I didn’t go back for the happy vinyl-browsing I’d promised myself. At any rate I managed to spend quite a bit of money at Lambiek, and I felt some grumpy, tired, Amsterdam-hating vibes coming on, so I walked towards the train station, stopping only at the American Bookstore in de Kalverstraat, where I found and bought a Glen Cook novel for the first time in many years, and in Fame records store. Because you know, the day wouldn’t be complete some record shopping.
One interesting thing about the American Bookstore was that it had quite a nice selection of manga. If I knew the first thing about what is and isn’t good manga I’d have bought some there.Unfortunately Fame had gone downhill a bit since I last shopped there; the rock section was nowhere to be found, everything was overpriced despite there being a ‘sale’ going on, and the basement was full of generic movie DVDs.

As I left Fame, I was momentarily disoriented. This is normal for me, because I’m spatially disadvantaged, but it was extra embarrassing because I was at Dam Square, which is just about the most familiar location in the Netherlands and I’d been there several times before!

I’ll blog some of the books I’ve bought after I’ve blogged the ones I’ve been reading.

Evil plots discovered while you wait

We all know how much fun you can have with Lego. The other day I picked up a catalogue and frankly was shocked by the way they managed to remove the fun factor with neigh surgical precision. They now have a thing called Lego explore, for kids aged 2+. This is no Lego! These aren’t building blocks, it’s all prefab crap! They just added useless pegs to give parents the impression it’s still Lego, it’s become a design statement if anything…
And there are some very disturbing products they are coming up with. Take for instance this heavy truck. In the first place, what’s with this Bob the builder-crap? In this day and age where nature conservation is the first thing our kids should learn, the most popular toys are of a guy who’s best friend are a bulldozer and a cement mixer?! And if you look at the Lego heavy truck, take a closer look at the driver. That’s one creepy mother! Unshaven, mean eyebrows, shades, evil smile! He’s not there to save the squirrel from extinction, that’s clear. Just look at the tires on that machine of his, not to mention the enormous exhaustpipe! Maybe the scandinavians are sick of their heating bills in winter and have created an evil plot to speed up world heating. Yeah, that’s got to be it…

Lines join in faint discord as the Stormwatch brews

Currently listening to: Stormwatch and A by Jethro Tull. These are the remastered editions. Both bear the logo of hate but I bought them anyway, because they are still very attractive to me as a long-standing Tullie overall.
Buyer Beware though: both albums had tracking errors on my Diskman. The DVD player can cope with them fine.

Stormwatch is the last of a trio of folky-sounding albums, but it’s much darker than its predecessors. Ian Anderson played much of the bass guitarhimself and I love his angular approach to the instrument. It doesn’t sound like any other bassist I know. All the other instrumental playing is excellent. However, the record is let down by the songwriting, which doesn’t have the fluency of Tull’s best efforts.

A, which I already had an original release CD of, is a much more interesting album musically. The arrival of three new musicians gave the group more of an edge, and the sound was unmistakably fresh and new. The apocalyptic tone of “Protect and Survive” and “Fylingdale Flyer” fit the mood of the time very well, and these songs still stand today. Unlike Stormwatch, A has no bonus tracks, but instead has a bonus DVD containing the long-unavailable “Slipstream” video.
What’s annoying about all concert recordings from Tull is Anderson’s tendency to a) tinker with the recording in the studio, re-doing much of the vocals, and b) in the case of videos, the misguided urge to make them “more than just a concert registration”, which leads to the interpolation of staged video fragments, recordings from other sources and the use of cheesy effects. Living With The Past was marred by this, but the problem, if anything, was worse with Slipstream, where the concert footage is rudely interrupted by a music video set to “Sweet Dream” off the Bursting Out album, and another one of the then-current band performing a cheesy mime act to “Too Old to Rock’n’Roll, Too Young To Die”, recorded five years earlier by a different line-up of the group. On the up side, the concert footage itself is excellent, and one other video, for “Fylingdale Flyer” is actually moderately interesting. The package as a whole is more than satisfying.