Interview with Joost Pollman

Dagblad van het Noorden has an interview with Joost Pollman, curator of the Comics Museum.

Quick summary by yours truly:

  • No precise date has been picked for the opening, but it will be in April
  • Joost is kept awake at night by all the stuff that still needs to be done (I know how that feels)
  • Attractions will include a “Moving Theatre” introducing comics to the masses, a “studio” demonstrating the modus operandi of several famous cartoonists, a coloring room where (presumably young) visitors can try their hands at working on a comic, and the webcomics room.
  • Joost is not a great comics lover, but an experienced exhibit organiser. Even his brother Peter Pontiac was hardly represented in his book collection.
  • Joost also discusses some of the constraints in which he has to work. The museum has no collection of its own and will not be able to do research. Also, a lot of work on the museum’s charter content was already done, and the museum’s focus was pre-destined to be on popular works from the Netherlands: Franka, Jan, Jans en de Kinderen and Heer Bommel among others.
  • Despite these constraints, Joost has a wish list of comics he wishes to exhibit. The range is pretty wide: he is working on an exhibit on Archie, Man of Steel but also supports the inclusion of young Dutch artists.
  • He says the museum will be aimed at a wider audience, not just hardcore fans.

Comics in the exhibit (7)

More artists who went above and beyond the call of duty for the Comics Museum’s digital exhibit:

Jesse Hamm of Happygoth
Charley Parker ofArgon Zark
Donna Barr of Stinz
Cayetano Garza, Jr. of Whimville
T. Campbell and the Waltrip brothers of Fans and Rip & Teri
Jeroen Jager of Capn
Scott McCloud

All these artists (and Adrian Ramos who I have mentioned several times before) have contributed hi-res art for the display columns
at very short notice, with little information from me about what was needed (because I was still figuring it out).

I’m reeling in the music and I’ve only had a few…

Currently playing obsessively: Lionheart by Kate Bush. I’m a huge fan of her eighties output, but coming back home from the pub late last night, I put this, her second album from 1978, on and it brought back all sorts of memories. It’s a lot less MOR than I remembered as well, with the orchestration and synths on “Don’t Push Your Foot on the Heartbrake” giving us a taste of the eerieness she’d later perfect for tracks like “And Dream of Sheep” on Hounds of Love.

Unfortunately my copy is an old, cheap, much-battered vinyl edition and sounds like it was recorded by a campfire. Needs cleaning up or replacement.

Reinder orders you to like this!

(Or: Comics for the exhibit, part the sixth)

Yet another comic with intimidatingly large archives, Narbonic. I still haven’t finished reading but recommend the Smart Gerbils storyline as a good (i.e. side-splittingly funny) starting point. This is what I’ve chosen for the exhibit.

You need a Modern Tales subscription to read this great story. I order you to want one!

Terrorist attack in Madrid

My knowledge of the background to today’s terrorist attack in Madrid (presumably by ETA despite denials from their official spokesbastards) can best be summed up as “bugger all” but I’m finding that close reading of recent postings and comments at A Fistful of Euros is helping me cure this ignorance. Go there.

Comic: Desperately Seeking

Almost immediately after finishing Pin Drop, I started work on a second volume of wordless comics. I drew several stories but because I started on a very busy job that year, the project fell by the wayside. Later, there was the launch of rocr.net in 2000 and all the other, newer comics work I was doing.

I wrote and drew this story, Desperately Seeking in 1998 but never published or indeed finished the last panel until now.

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Comics in the exhibit (5)

Bruno is one of those comics that you know you should read, but whose archives are a bit intimidating. I’ve finally done it, and feel humbled. Christopher Baldwin does realism extremely well, to the point where I start to wonder what I’m doing writing a fantasy comic. Then in the ghost story and the dream sequence he also proves that he can do fantasy better than almost anyone.
There is no other comic remotely like Bruno, to the best of my knowledge. A shoo-in for the exhibit.

Studio-mate Jeroen was impressed by the art when he saw me rooting through the Vast and Intimidating Archive and later asked me for the URL.